What Mountain is that? Mt Maroon

MT MAROON

Height 964m
Location: Mt Barney National Park

 

Mt Maroon by Jason Charles Hill

Mt Maroon by Jason Charles Hill

Chasing spectacular views and great walking? Look no further than Mt Maroon.

It’s one of seven peaks located in the Mt Barney National Park and is the remains of an ancient Focal Peak Shield volcano which erupted more than 26-million years ago.

With a peak of 964m, Mt Maroon features long columns of rhyolite and offers climbers great challenges. But this isn’t a mountain for the uninitiated.

Mt Maroon

Mt Maroon

Mt Maroon was first gazetted in 1938 as Mount Maroon National park. In 1950 Mt Barney National Park was extended to include Mt Maroon and the nearby Mt May.

The mountain’s original indigenous name was Wahlmoorum, which means sand goanna in the Yuggera language.

In the early 1820s many of the mountains in the area were given European names by Captain Patrick Logan and botanists Alan Cunningham and Charles Fraser, who explored the region.

By the 1840s the surrounding foothills were opened up for cattle grazing. Logging began in the high ridges. Cut stumps can be seen in parts of the park and are a reminder of the times.

The walk to the Mt Maroon summit is difficult and should only be tackled by experienced walkers. Seek information at the Rathdowney Visitor Information Centre, and from local tour operators.

Mt Barney National Park is home to more than 34 types of mammals, 182 birds varieties, 40 reptiles and 71 frog species.

The Cotsworld Track leads to the Mt Maroon summit and is a Class 5 walk. It is steep and rocky but once you reach the summit you’ll enjoy spectacular views of Mt Barney

Allow about eight hours walking time and in spring you’ll see gorgeous wildflower displays, set against the craggy peaks of Mt Maroon.

Picnic facilities are located at Yellowpinch at the base of Mt Barney.