What Mountain is that? Mt Edwards

What mountain is that? Mt Edwards

Height: 634m
Location: Accessed via Lake Moogerah

Image by @brentrandallphotography via Instagram.

Image by @brentrandallphotography via Instagram.

Mt Edwards is located in the Moogerah Peaks National Park and is accessed from the Lake Moogerah picnic grounds.
This walk is said to be one of the easiest of the Moogerah peaks.

Image by @genwindley via Instagram

Image by @genwindley via Instagram

The ancient volcanic peaks of Mounts French, Greville, Moon and Edwards are recognised not only for their unique shapes and as favourite bushwalking destinations, but also as remnant habitats of key conservation value within south-east Queensland.

Mount Edwards is a large trachyte plug, which was formed when magma filled vertical pipe-like fissures. 

 

Image by @seq_traveller via Instagram.

Image by @seq_traveller via Instagram.

Mt Edwards is accessed from a track which starts on the opposite side of the dam wall from the Lake Moogerah picnic area.

While there are no formed tracks to the top of Mt Edwards, the route is well-worn. However be advised there are no signs or facilities so you must be self-reliant.
The route can be completed in half a day and is a Class 5 walk.
Picnic and toilet facilities are available at Lake Moogerah. Camping is available at the lake too.

Image by @genwindley via Instagram.

Image by @genwindley via Instagram.

The Moogerah Peaks are mostly covered in open eucalypt forest with montane heath on the exposed rock faces and rainforest in some sheltered areas.

The National Park is located in what was once beneath the belly of a volcano – the ancient Main Range volcano, which erupted some 24 million years ago. The eastern flank of this volcano once spread across the Fassifern Valley. It erupted mainly basalt lavas, which may have been as thick as 1000m near the volcano’s crest.

Image by @alterd_mind via Instagram.

Image by @alterd_mind via Instagram.

The distinct peaks of the Moogerah Peaks National Park had their origins deep below the volcano. Composed of different rock types separated from basalt magma at great depths, they formed as plugs, dykes or sills when magma entered numerous cracks and weaknesses in underlying older rocks, as well as moving up the main vents.